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ATLANTA PUPPET
SCHOOL PROGRAMS

STUDY GUIDE LESSON PLAN FOR
WEATHER SHOW

Science / Meteorolgy -
THE WIND BLOWS

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STUDY GUIDE PAGE LINKS
[ STUDY GUIDE START ] [ WIND-BLOWS ] [ WEATHER-STUDY ] [ BASIC-ASPECTS ] [ LIGHTNING-SAFETY ] [ IDIOM LESSON ] [ WIND-VANE ]


The Wind Blows

Submitted by: Rebecca Schende and Melissa Patel
School/University/Affiliation: University of Montana
Endorsed by: Ms. Lisa Blank
University of Montana


Grade Level(s): 2

Subject(s):

  • Science/Meteorology

Duration: 45-60 minutes

Description: Students will experiment with leaves, feathers, paper, and tissue to determine which is carried farthest by the wind. They will measure the distances and compare the results.

Goals: Students will understand that wind is moving air by observing moving objects. Students will be able to determine how strong the wind is blowing by the distance traveled by different objects.

NSS standards: Earth Science
Weather changes from day to day and over the seasons. Weather can be described by measurable quantities, such as temperature, wind direction and speed, and precipitation.

Objectives: By experimenting with various materials, students will be able to apply their knowledge to predict the outcome of a similar situation on a prediction sheet.

Materials:
The Wind Blows Data Sheet (see bottom of page)
pencil
4 fans (dependent on weather)
students' choice of non-traitional measurement tools (foot cut-out, hand cut-out)
feathers
leaves
pieces of paper (different sizes)
tissues (different sizes)
styrofoam ball
large marble

Procedure:
Scientific Explanation: We canít see air or wind, but we can see things that the wind is moving: particles of dirt or sand, leaves on the trees, the clouds scurrying across the sky, sailboats moving across the lakes, and the flag boldly waving. Students will not actually be measuring the speed of the wind (distance/time), instead they will be observing the movement of various materials and comparing their distance traveled.The air moves because it has been warmed by the sun. Wind is caused by the uneven heating of the air by the sun. As the sun heats the air, it expands and rises. Air from cooler areas then rushes in to replace the heated air. Cold air is denser and has higher pressure; warm air is less dense and has lower pressure. Air flows from areas of high pressure to areas of low pressure.

Focus Phase: How do we know when air is moving? Discuss how we use our senses to determine if the air is moving. Can we see the air moving? What can we observe that tells us that the air is moving? Discuss dust particles, moving grass, flags, etc. Is it windy outside today? How do you know that? What are some common things you see being blown by the wind? Why do you think some objects move farther than others? Record on the flip chart. Show the class a piece of paper and a tissue. Have students label a folded piece of paper "Paper" and "Tissue". Have the students predict which will travel the furthest and why.

Challenge Phase: Students will test their prediction by testing different materials including paper and tissue. Students will stand on a marked line in front of a fan and drop each item to see how far they will travel. In groups, students will measure the distance traveled by each material on their data sheet. They will rank which objects traveled the farthest based on the data collected. Does the size of the object matter? (It is possible that students will want to explore the effects of different wind speeds.) Do light objects behave differently than heavy objects? Does the shape of the object matter?

Concept Introduction: Students will regroup and share how they ranked their objects. Record the class findings on the board (1-4). If any rankings differ, ask why that may have happened. Use refocusing questions if needed (such as: What did you notice about the different sizes? What did you notice about all the objects that ranked in the "least farthest" category or the "farthest" category?) Ask again which object traveled farther, the tissue or the paper and why. Have students record the results on their prediction sheets. Did you prove your prediction to be true? On the flip chart, list what discoveries were made about observing the wind.

Concept Application: Show the class a styrofoam ball and a large marble. On the back of their prediction sheet, ask the students to predict which object will travel the farthest and why.

Assessment:

Students will demonstrate their understandings by:
1) Correctly predicting which object will travel further: the styrofoam ball or the large marble.
2) Correctly explaining why they made this prediction.

The Wind Blows Data Sheet

Name:_______________

You Need: A leaf A piece of paper A feather A piece of tissue

Do This: 1. Hold the object 2. Let go 3. Mark and measure
Which one will the wind carry farthest?

Measure

Object Drop 1 Drop 2 Drop 3 Order
Leaf
Feather
Paper
Tissue

STUDY GUIDE PAGE LINKS
[ STUDY GUIDE START ] [ WIND-BLOWS ] [ WEATHER-STUDY ] [ BASIC-ASPECTS ] [ LIGHTNING-SAFETY ] [ IDIOM LESSON ] [ WIND-VANE ]